How Twitter processes tons of mobile application data each day

Gigaom

It’s only been seven months since Twitter released its Answers tool, which was designed to provide users with mobile application analytics. But since that time, Twitter now sees roughly five billion daily sessions in which “hundreds of millions of devices send millions of events every second to the Answers endpoint,” the company explained in a blog post on Tuesday. Clearly, that’s a lot of data that needs to get processed and in the blog post, Twitter detailed how it configured its architecture to handle the task.

The backbone of Answers was created to handle how the mobile application data is received, archived, processed in real time and processed in chunks (otherwise known as batch processing).

Each time an organization uses the Answer tool to learn more how his or her mobile app is functioning, Twitter logs and compresses all that data (which gets set in batches) in order to…

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Product Hunt Wins Best New Startup Of 2014

TechCrunch

Product Hunt, the online community where members submit and vote up the best new tech products, has been taking the industry by storm as founders, investors, early adopters and other tech enthusiasts now check the site on a daily basis. Today, the company also has the honor of winning the Crunchie award for “best new startup,” beating out runner-up Shyp to take home the trophy.

The award was presented this evening at the 8th Annual Crunchies Awards, the competition hosted by TechCrunch and VentureBeat, which seeks to recognize the most notable startups and innovations of the year.

Product Hunt began its life in 2013 as an email newsletter about founder Ryan Hoover’s favorite products, and then grew to become an online destination where users could submit and then vote up their own favorites, similar to something like Reddit. Later, Reddit co-founder Alexis Ohanian also invested in the service when the company raised…

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LG wants to take on Sonos with cheaper connected speakers

Gigaom

LG thinks it has a shot to take on Sonos with its new Music Flow connected loudspeakers, and it’s banking on two thing: Content and costs. The Korean consumer electronics giant has teamed up with Google to add Google Cast to its Music Flow devices, allowing consumers to cast audio straight from apps like Pandora, Rdio, TuneIn and others. And it may sell its cheapest connected speaker for as little as $100.

lg music flow

LG is showing off a variety of Music Flow speakers, including a sound bar with subwoofer and a battery-powered mobile speaker, at CES in Las Vegas this week. The company hasn’t announced any firm release date or details on a suggested retail price yet, but I was told by one of the LG spokespeople on the floor that Music Flow speakers will be available this spring, and that the price will be “significantly cheaper” than the competition. I wanted…

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In 2015, Software Eats The Wearable World

TechCrunch

Editor’s Note: Elliot Loh is a founder and partner at the San Francisco startup studio The Giant Pixel Corp. Kunal Agarwal is an entrepreneur in residence at Giant Pixel. 

2014 will be remembered as the year that wearables leapt into the Silicon Valley mainstream.  Tech giants like Apple, Google, Microsoft, Intel, Qualcomm have taken notice and poured money and resources into developing their own offerings.

Earlier players like Fitbit and Jawbone announced multiple new products and a host of promising startups (Athos, Atlas, Misfit, etc.) have emerged with innovative offerings.

With the momentum of these dollars and product releases, its no wonder industry analysts are predicting the wearable movement to be “the next big thing”.  Credit Suisse estimates the market could be $50 billion in 5 years, and Morgan Stanley claims the wearable market could reach $1.6 trillion in value.

Those of us closer to the leading edge know…

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Yup, 2014 was a big year in cloud

Gigaom

2014 was the year in which both Microsoft and Google got serious about their public cloud options and taking on Amazon Web Services directly with their own Infrastructure as a Service and associated services.

That both of these companies have extremely deep pockets is not lost on the market leader AWS which continues to roll out new, and higher-level services frequently. If you’re a cloud deployer or would-be cloud deployer, AWS Re:Invent is a must-attend event.

Long story short: [company]Google[/company] and [company]Microsoft[/company] have made huge strides, but AWS, with its 8-year head start, remains the cloud to beat. It’s a good time to be a cloud customer provided you can track the dueling product releases and price cuts and can manage to keep yourself out of the vendor lock-in that afflicted many IT shops in the past few decades.

Cybersecurity fears grow

The counterpoint to all of the above is that 2014 was…

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